Theory & Practice : Metaphor

Task 1

The passage of time:

In film the passing of time has been shown through visual representations such as a Calendar being flipped through, Clock hands spinning at a speedy pace, Flowers wilting, the sun and/or moon setting and rising at a quick speed, and the weather changing. When I think of  time passing in a film, I always think back to one scene from Lady and the Tramp. Where months are shown to have passed by using clocks, the changing weather, but mainly by the calender. While also pausing for a few short scenes showing the expecting parents preparing for the baby’s arrival.

(09:55 – )

In computers and software, small icons such as the, never beloved, hourglass or buffering sign indicates that some time may be needed to fully start up the video, or perform the task.

Controlling movement:

On a computer movement is controlled by the cursor. Customizable, but usually an arrow.

Tools in software programs:

The tools normally used in software are usually self explanatory. The fill/bucket tool fills the whole selected shape with colour, the brush/pencil tool allows you to draw, the line tool creates lines, the magnifying glass allows you to zoom in and out, etc. Sometimes, some toolbox features can be a little more tricky in working, or working a certain way, but the basic gist of all these tools is normally very simple to perform.

Task 2

You can’t take something like the desktop so literally. The purpose of the desktop is for ease of use, everything is created to be simple to work and using already familiar concepts to aid us more in it’s basic understanding. For example, most files are represented by paper icons, or image icons, which can be placed in a folder…. Represented by a folder. Anything unwanted is put in the recycling bin, and if you want to remove it completely then empty your bin.

The suggested “reality” of how a Desktop should perform would create far more hassle than it’s worth. You would have to click and hold to open the folder, as you would in reality, and shift through layers of material to find something.

Task 3

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Task 5

Role-play can be another way to engage users in a affective domain. To have them take on a role and think in that way, to illustrate the point. To take on the attitudes and values of the role at play.

Task 6

If I open a lot of programs on my computer, and as a result my computer starts to lagg, that is an example of causality. My computer is lagging, and it’s cause was too many programs open which was a choice of mine to do.

If I place a file in a folder, and then sometime later delete that folder, I’ve now lost the file. The cause was deleting the folder.

Cursality: When I’m closing my browser, I can either right click on it’s icon in the task bar, go to control and click the option “exist”, open task manager and select “End now” on it, or the commonly used x button in the top right corner. One action, a few different ways to perform it.

Task 7

This yellow button on an online store allows customers to add the item(s) to a virtual shopping cart. It’s a bright, contrasting colour to the background, and can be obviously seen to be a button, depicting it’s performed action.

Although far more simplistic that the above button, Facebook’s “like”, “comment” & “share” are known enough to not be confusing. The pop up with the text stating it’s performed action  helps us understand that this is a clickable option.

 Here is an example of some confusing affordance. The links at the side are organized by letters and symbols. To show what’s been recently updated, what is in which form of money etc. Any new user, or user unfamiliar with this concept would find it harder to navigate the website.

http://www.slideshare.net/andrewmaier/affordances-in-modern-web-design

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